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Hanging Picture Frame on Metal Stud

Discussion in 'Homeowners Corner' started by Kirk, May 4, 2005.

  1. Kirk

    Kirk New Member

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    I apologize if this was brought up before but I was not able to find it via search. Surprisingly I was not able to find much help on google either.

    My house has metal studs and I would like to hang picture frames up. In some places I will have only drywall. I assume I should use a plastic anchor and a screw. In some places I will go into a metal stud. What kind of screw should I use? Does it need to go in at an angle so it doesn't slip out? How should I do this?
     
  2. brim

    brim Member

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    Drill a pilot hole and use a small metal/machine screw (pilot hole unnecessary if you use a self-tapping screw). Install at an angle if you like, but it's a metal stud so I doubt there'd be much slippage.

    Plastic anchors aren't always necessary depending on the weight of your artwork. You can get these nice hangers at Wal-Mart/Target that have one, two, or three little angled nails depending on the weight of your piece...and you don't have to put in an ugly toggle/anchor. I've looked on google and a couple other sites and can't find a picture of one...they're kinda hard to explain. Brass with black nails w/ black knurled heads.
     
  3. Neighbor

    Neighbor New Member

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    If the artwork or framed mirror is heavy, I would use a wall anchor in the drywall (assuming you miss a stud). You drill a hole, insert the anchor, and drive the srew. The anchor expands behind the drywall. Then back it of a few turns to hang the wire on the back of the frame.

    In the metal stud, just drill a pilot hole and use a machine screw that is bigger than the pilot you drilled.

    Hope it helps
     
  4. WesGurney

    WesGurney New Member

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    Check out OOK's picture hangers. They have hangers that support up to 100 lbs that can be put into drywall without worrying about anchoring into studs.

    Here is a link for you http://www.ooks.com/cart/category.cfm?cat=17&sub=80

    They are available at Home Depot.

    Good luck!
     
  5. Wick

    Wick New Member

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    We have tons of pictures in our house and have NEVER focused on using a stud (whether metal or wood). We have used the items that Wes suggested as well as the drywall anchors. Both types of hangers work great. We have had no problems. However, one issue to keep in mind with the anchors is that they leave a larger hole than the OOK hangers, which have a nice small entry hole into the drywall.
     
  6. Kirk

    Kirk New Member

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    Thanks everyone for all the great information and advice. I've gotten a lot more information here in a much shorter time than I spent searching the Web.

    I used an OOK picture hanger a while back but it was on an exterior wall that has wooden studs. I'm not sure if I needed to nail it into a stud (thinking back I don't think the nail was even that long). My concern is that due to the placement of the frame I'll probably be nailing or screwing into a metal stud. The stud just happens to be there. The frame has a single triangular hinge mounted near the top so it doesn't give me much freedom. It is light (probably 2 pounds).

    In the future I would like to mount heavier items so I appreciate any more information and tips for mounting especially on metal studs. Thanks again for all the great advice so far........
     
  7. brim

    brim Member

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    Yah, the OOK is what I was talking about. Thats what I use and they're great.

    If you go with those, you don't have to worry about hitting a stud, metal or otherwise, because the nail is only long enough to go through the drywall.
     
  8. dcdavis

    dcdavis Ooops!!

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    And heck, if it's only 2 pounds, I don't think there's a need to try to hit a stud.

    I hung up a HUGE floor mirror from Costco with two of OOK's 100lb wall hangers (funny how a ~70lb "floor" mirror also comes with picture hangers drilled into the back of it and many disclaimers to only use it as a floor mirror!). So far, no problems. They work really well.
     
  9. Kirk

    Kirk New Member

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    Sorry I wasn't more clear. In the case of the 2-pound frame I'm not trying to hit a stud. It just happens that there is a metal stud right where I need to put in the nail, screw or hanger. I assumed that putting in a long nail there would have caused damage if it didn't cleanly pierce the metal stud so I thought I would need to drill a pilot hole and put in a screw. But it looks like I can use a wall hanger because the nail doesn't reach the stud.

    Thanks for the information about the mirror. I would like to put one up, too. So your mirror is mounted only to the drywall?

    I always thought drywall was too weak and crumbly but all your posts give me a lot more confidence. Thanks again.
     
  10. dcdavis

    dcdavis Ooops!!

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    I think the OOK hangers distribute the force (weight) of the object very well, which is why they can hold such heavy weights. The nails are super strong, and the hook is very thick and reinforced to avoid ripping down the drywall. Also, I believe the angle of the nail helps it not to break the drywall.

    I've only had mine up for about 3 months, so I can't speak to the longevity of this option, but I think it is very sturdy (and I haven't noticed any slippage, etc).
     
  11. Zansu

    Zansu New Member

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    I'm not familiar with the OOK name, but I've been using picture hangars forever. Even with big heavy mirrors -- just choose the right weight for the piece. I mostly use 20lb hangars because most of the pictures are less than 10 lbs. Haven't had a problem in 20+ years and 6+ houses/apartments. one piece I have is a VERY heavy Oak framed mirror. 2 50lb hooks, no problem.
     

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