1. Yes, it's a whole new look! Have questions or need help? Please post your question in the New Forum Questions thread Click the X to the right to dismiss this notice
  2. Seeing tons of unread posts after the upgrade? See this thread for help. Click the X to the right to dismiss this notice

Elm Disease?

Discussion in 'Nature/Habitat/Garden Corner' started by Broth, Sep 8, 2014.

  1. Broth

    Broth New Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Anyone know what's up with the elms in central Broadlands? Entire streets have elms afflicted with some sort of disease which appears to rapidly cause leaves to become rust colored and die. The trees are also covered in webs- it's difficult to tell whether they belong to caterpillars or spiders, but they look awful and make them terrible to walk under. No other species seem to be affected, including the China-derived Lacebark Elms.

    I didn't notice any issues as recently as a couple weeks ago- it's going to be a real mess if the neighborhood is full of dozens of dead, fully-grown trees.
     
  2. KTdid

    KTdid Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Messages:
    3,144
    Likes Received:
    84
    Unfortunately, the standard care for diseased trees in Broadlands is to cut them down.
     
  3. capfan1

    capfan1 Guest

    The street trees on Marsh Creek are honey locust and are infested with mimosa webworms. We had Care of Trees come out and spray the tree in our yard. Have stopped walking on the sidewalk at one end of the street because it's so bad.
     
    Tree_Dr. likes this.
  4. KTdid

    KTdid Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Messages:
    3,144
    Likes Received:
    84
    They're as bad as gypsy moths. They dangle down from the trees by a single silken strand and you don't always see them before walking into them - ugh!
     
  5. Tree_Dr.

    Tree_Dr. New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    2
    Capfan is correct. The trees on Marsh Creek Drive are Honey Locust and this is a particularly bad year for web worms. There is still time to treat many of the species. Additionally, a late fall horticultural oil application will help for next year. Additional preemptive approaches for next season include an early spring application of a systemic insecticide and soil applications of compost tea and/or fertilizer depending on the situation.

    Other cultural practices can help your trees to thrive:
    ~Deep watering (not just the sprinklers for your lawn, but a slow trickle with the hose for extended time periods to allow the water to get down approximately 12"+ deep)
    ~Mulch wide, not deep! The wider the better. Turf and trees compete for nutrients, so allow your trees the rooting area they need to thrive by expanding your mulch beds. If your tree trunk looks like a telephone pole going into the ground, the mulch is likely too deep. You should carefully remove excess mulch until you can see the root flare begin (looks kind of like a volcano base). Mulch needs to be turned and freshened to a depth of 2-4" at least twice a year to allow for water penetration and to assist in the breakdown of the organic materials in the mulch that will ultimately improve your soil conditions and the health of your tree.
    ~Proper pruning. Each tree is unique and will have different pruning needs. Additionally, your goals for the tree and your landscape will dictate the proper course of action. That said, always strive to make proper pruning cuts (see attached image).

    As always, contact a certified arborist for a consultation on your property. Ask your neighbors for a referral!
     

    Attached Files:

    boomertsfx likes this.
  6. David Wolf

    David Wolf New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2014
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I live on Marsh Creek closest to Vestals Gap. The trees are not as bad on this end of the street but still have issues. The Locust and Maples trees in our yard all had insect issues after the hard winter. I contacted Jeremy Baker at the Care of Trees (703-661-1700). They did a fantastic job. They pruned all the dead limbs to allow for new growth. They applied an insecticide and soil application that killed all the bugs that were damaging the trees and fostered new growth. Jeremy and his team did a great job. I could not be happier.

    For the Locust web worms, they told me purchase Sevin pesticide (home depot or Lowes). You have to spray the tree and leaves but it will kill the web worms. Get the Sevin bottles that are concentrated and have a sprayer on them so you can just connect your house. The smaller household bottles does not work. This is more for gardens and smaller bushes. You will need a ladder to reach the higher portions of the tree. Be prepared that as soon as you start spraying, the worms all come down to get away from the insecticide. I sprayed the drive way, grass, and side walk to ensure I got them all. We still have a few here and there but it is significantly less.
    care of trees 2.jpg care of trees 3.jpg
     
  7. KTdid

    KTdid Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Messages:
    3,144
    Likes Received:
    84
    Isn't Sevin overkill since they already applied an insecticide? It's very toxic to pollinators and mammals.
     

Share This Page