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Local source for electronic components (resistors, diodes, etc)

Discussion in 'General Chat Forum' started by flynnibus, Feb 10, 2013.

  1. flynnibus

    flynnibus Well-Known Member Forum Staff

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    Anyone know a local source for these types of bits? It's nuts to have to order online for just a few resistors..

    Anyone know a local retailer that stocks electronic components anymore? Radio Shack doesn't stock the type I need...
     
  2. hometheaterguy

    hometheaterguy New Member

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    Nothing local. But there is a place called Arcade Electronics off Edsall and 395.
     
  3. foodie

    foodie New Member

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    flynnibus--

    I saw your question and asked DH who is an Electrical Engineer Mgr. and electronics "geek" too. He suggested for local sources try the following sites.

    Local Sources for Electronic Components, etc.--enjoy!:)

    www.baynesvilleelectronics.com (Baynesville Electronics' site/info. Located in Towson/Baltimore, MD area.)
    www.markelectronics.com (Mark Electronics' site/info. Located in Beltsville, MD area.)

    DH has used the above-mentioned stores and found some great stuff so he tells me.:)

    Also, you probably know about the following online sources (per DH's input), and DH has ordered for work and home too--

    www.mouser.com (Mouser's site/info.)
    www.digikey.com (Digikey's site/info.)

    Hope this helps--

    Foodie (Katie);)
     
  4. flynnibus

    flynnibus Well-Known Member Forum Staff

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    thanks foodie
     
  5. flynnibus

    flynnibus Well-Known Member Forum Staff

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    I'll keep them in mind.. unfortunately they only keep bankers hours :(
     
  6. Mr. Linux

    Mr. Linux Senior Member & Moderator Forum Staff

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    Flynnibus, ping me with what you need. I've been pretty active in electronics as a side hobby for the past year or two and I have a bunch of components. I have boxes full of resistors, capacitors, diodes, etc. If I have what you're looking for, I'll be glad to help.
     
  7. flynnibus

    flynnibus Well-Known Member Forum Staff

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    Qty 1 56 Ohm, 1/4w 5% ceramic axial resistor :)

    Green, Blue, Black, Gold

    I made a stupid mistake when rebuilding this board and cut the wrong component... *bangs head*
     
  8. Mr. Linux

    Mr. Linux Senior Member & Moderator Forum Staff

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    No prob - I'll look in my supply box when I get home from work and hit you offline/by email.

    My only price is I get to play a few games on the machine once it's up and running ;-)
     
  9. flynnibus

    flynnibus Well-Known Member Forum Staff

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    Always open :) The herd has grown since you've last seen it I bet. But the game I am tinkering on is the I500 game you did invest some muscle in for me :)
     
  10. foodie

    foodie New Member

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    flynn--

    Whew--just came in from feeding the horses and pigs!;)

    Anyway hope you are able to find whatever you need. You are welcome.;)

    Foodie (Katie);)
     
  11. Mike-and-Kim

    Mike-and-Kim Member

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    If Eric does not find one, I have one that you can have.
     
  12. hometheaterguy

    hometheaterguy New Member

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    Not to hi-jack this thread, but I have a techie question... Need a little multimeter 101 here...

    In the amperage dial I have settings of 2m, 20m, 200m... In 20m I show a reading of 0.18 which I interpret as a fraction of a milliamp but I'm told it is actually 180 milliamps.

    What is correct. And if it is 180 milliamps, why does the meter put the decimal 3 places to the left? Does the m in 20m not stand for milliamp?

    I don't get it...
     
  13. flynnibus

    flynnibus Well-Known Member Forum Staff

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    that should be setting the range and the scale... so the number displayed should be scaled by the setting. mA should be milli-amp and a 0.18 reading in 20mA I would interpret as 0.18 mA which would make me switch to the 2mA which should still be able to read it but be more accurate because the value was so low relative to the range. Since you said both settings had m (I assume mA) it should still be reading in the fractions of a milliAmp.

    But I'd see if you could find the manual for the meter online if there is confusion. But I would read it the same as you did to start with at least :) Make sure the labels are all in fact mA and one isn't u - for micro (6 decimal places)
     
  14. hometheaterguy

    hometheaterguy New Member

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    It's not micro... But here's the kicker - when I switch to 2m it reads .018 and when I switch to 200m it reads 1.8

    I can't figure out what the m stands for if it isn't milli. As of now 3 colleagues say 180mA and 2 say .18mA.

    Everyone's feeling stupider the more we discuss.
     
  15. Mr. Linux

    Mr. Linux Senior Member & Moderator Forum Staff

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    The numbers on the face of the Multimeter (200m, 20m, 2m, 200ยต) tell you what the highest current that the Multimeter can read in that setting. Thus, the lowest possible setting is preferred because it gives us the most decimal places (there is only room for four). The number on the screen tells you the current and has units of mA (milliamps).

    Here's a small tip I found on the net which might also help:

    General rule for measuring currents with multimeters:

    Start with the highest range available (in this case: 2000 mA).
    If you read a value below the next lower range (in your case: 200 mA), change to this lower range.
    If the value is below the next available lower range, again, go one step down.
     
  16. Mike-and-Kim

    Mike-and-Kim Member

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    Sounds like the current scale on an older meter like a Fluke 8060?

    At any rate, you could always just grab a 1K resistor, and a single cell battery (e.g. a AA). That should give you around 1.5mA through that resistor. I do something similar to double check my readings on spectrum analyzers.

    Do you have it set to the appropriate DC or AC current setting?
     

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