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Stone house at Hillside Park

Discussion in 'Broadlands Community Issues' started by cobymom, Jun 16, 2009.

  1. ayayagirl

    ayayagirl New Member

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    I am surprised to hear this. Why isn't it a "historic site" and what would it take to make it one? It certainly seems to have much history!
     
  2. Ozgood

    Ozgood Not a space alien

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    What is the historical significance of this building? I am not familiar with its history.
     
  3. cobymom

    cobymom Sheila Ryan

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  4. msflynn

    msflynn New Member

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    And several years ago I received this email detailing Rachel Lefevere Wrenn family line



    We visited the LeFEVRE Family Cemetery near the community swimming pool in Broadlands today because my wife Eileen is very distantly related (and then only by marriage) to Rachel LeFEVRE WRENN who is buried there. Eileen is a descendant of Nicholas WREN who was an ancestor of Moultrie F. WRENN, husband of Rachel.

    The WREN(N)s, who changed the spelling of their name in the mid-19th Century, were a prominent (or at least "large") family in Virginia. One member, Col. James WREN, designed or built several key structures in Northern Virginia, including the old Fairfax County Courthouse which still stands in Fairfax City, and the "Falls Church" after which the city was named. Col. James and his descendants lived mainly in the eastern part of Fairfax County, near Falls Church. Col. James's uncle, Col. Thomas WREN, was from the western part of the county, and his descendants lived around Chantilly and nearby Loudoun County. A few WRENNs owned farms on what is now Dulles International Airport. Some members of both branches of the family moved west in the 19th Century, and WRENNs can be found in Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, Texas, and even as far west as Oregon.

    Even though the WRENN connection to Broadlands is only through the marriage of Moultrie F. WRENN to Rachel LeFEVRE, we thought it might be useful for you to have the descendant report below which shows the ancestors of Moultrie F. WRENN. Perhaps some future historian in your community might wonder why Rachel WRENN's appears on the stone in the LeFEVRE Family Cemetery.

    Here's a brief key to deciphering the report:

    ******* 7. Moultrie Franklin (Frederick?) WRENN (May 1865/Prince William Co VA-23 Oct 1926/Weyers Cave, Augusta Co VA +#1.Rachel E LeFEVER/LeFEVRE 9 Sep 1869-20 Mar 1892/Waxpool, Loudoun Co VA #2.27 Mar 1912/Page Co VA Mary Miller WALKER 1881 or 1891/VA-)

    Moultrie, a 7th generation WRENN, was born in Prince William County in 1865 and died in Augusta County in 1926. His first marriage was to Rachel E. LeFEVRE, and he married his second wife, Mary Miller WALKER, in 1912.

    The full report is listed below.


    Ancestors of Moultrie F. Wrenn, husband of Rachel (LeFevre) Wrenn
    1. Nicholas WREN (1631-1701 +c1670/Lancaster Co VA Margaret BELL 1650-Feb 1701/Lancaster Co VA) (NOTE: In "Wren’s of Virginia," John Howard Wren’s comprehensive study of the family, John notes that in Oct 1652 a Nicho WRENN was indentured to William BAULDWIN whose plantation was on the south side of the York River near Skimino Creek, today’s border between James City and York Counties VA. John’s research revealed that, in Feb 1664, Nicholas RENN was granted 100 acres on the north side of the York in Gloucester Co. and in the 1670s Nicholas is listed as a landowner in Lancaster Co. which is on the north shore of the Rappahannock River. The peninsula between the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers is known as the Northern Neck. Nicholas’s property was near today’s town of Irvington VA, Christ Church parish, in the southern part of the county. The will of Nicholas WREN in 1701 mentions his wife Margaret and their sons, Nicholas & William.)
    ** 2. William (Will) WREN (1674-1710/Lancaster Co VA +Elizabeth HOWARD STEPTOE 1679-c1741/Lancaster Co VA) (NOTE: The will of William WREN in 1710 lists his wife Elizabeth and children John, William, Thomas, and Elizabeth.)
    *** 3. Col. Thomas WREN (1703-Oct 1767 or 8 Sep 1768/Fairfax Co VA +Jean CARTER 1704- +? Frances J JONES) (NOTE: Thomas was Sub-sheriff of Fairfax Co in 1747, and a vestryman of Truro Parish from 1749 to 1767. Thomas WREN’s will dated 16 May 1760 is in Fairfax Co. Will Book C, p.27. Thomas mentions sons Nicholas, William, John, Traverse(sic), and Isaac, daughter Winney(sic) WREN ATHILL, daughters Ann & Mary, and wife Jean.)
    **** 4. Capt John WREN (1737-1815 +Elizabeth GUNNELL) (NOTE: Capt John WREN was apparently a witness to the will of his cousin, Col. James WREN, in 1808.)
    (COMMENT: Melvin E. Steadman, author of "By Fence & Fireside," a history of Falls Church, listed the persons below as descendants of James WREN Jr (1755-1827), son of Col. James WREN (1727-1815), architect of the church after which the City of Falls Church was named. However, Norma Warrick of Chanute KS provided a list of the true descendants of James WREN Jr. which differed from those listed by Steadman. John Weiler of McLean VA, in a paper posted at the Falls Church Library, suggested that the persons listed below were more likely descendants of Capt John WREN. In any case, all these individuals are descendants of Nicholas WREN (1601-1731). Col. James WREN of Falls Church was a nephew of Col. Thomas WREN above.)
    ***** 5. Robert A WRENN (-1821/Fairfax Co. VA +Sarah (Sallie) ADAMS) (NOTE: The children listed below for Robert & Sallie may be found in Chancery File cff 42h in Fairfax Co. Courthouse Archives.)
    ****** 6. Philip WRENN (1824/Prince William Co VA-11 Dec 1875/Alexandria Co VA +Susan C VERMILLION, 1830-7 Mar 1903/DC) (NOTE: Philip, a carpenter, and Susan C WRENN were living near Haymarket in Prince William County in the 1850 & 1860 Census. By 1870 they had moved to Fairfax Courthouse (today's Fairfax City). Philip's date of death is from "Alexandria (Arlington) County Death Records, 1853-1896" which say Philip died of typhoid. He was living with one of his sons, Sam WREN, in Alexandria County. In 1880 Susan, a widow, and several of her children were living near Dranesville. "Susan (widow Philip)" first appeared in DC city directories in 1893. Moultrie WRENN appeared in later years. Both Philip & Susan are buried at Chestnut Grove, Herndon.)
    ******* 7. Moultrie Franklin (Frederick?) WRENN (May 1865/Prince William Co VA-23 Oct 1926/Weyers Cave, Augusta Co VA +#1.Rachel E LeFEVER/LeFEVRE 9 Sep 1869-20 Mar 1892/Waxpool, Loudoun Co VA #2.27 Mar 1912/Page Co VA Mary Miller WALKER 1881 or 1891/VA-) (NOTE: Loudoun Co records list Moultrie F WRENN as a laborer in Waxpool in 1891. Rachel's death is reported in Loudoun Co records. She is buried at Hillside Cemetery near Waxpool ("Loudoun County VA Cemeteries" by the Balch Library). The cemetery, listed on the 2003 Loudoun Co. ADC map as "Broad Run Cemetery" but called the "LeFEVRE Family Cemetery" locally, is on Waxpool Rd. just west of LeFevre Inn Dr. near the community pool on the edge of the Broadlands subdivision. Rachel is listed on a stone memorial as "Rachel WRENN." The old LeFEVRE family home, a stone house, is directly across Waxpool Rd. from the cemetery. In the 1900 Census, Moultrie (born May 1865) is living in Loudoun's Broad Run District with his nephew, Charles R WRENN (born Mar 1888/VA). Moultrie appears in the 1910 DC city directory with his sister Rosa. In the 1910 DC Census (Film 155, ED-207, Sheet 6B, 1120 Lamont NW) Moultrie A(sic) WRENN, 45 (b.c1865)/VA, widowed, and working as a "Traveling representative for a music school," was living with his sister, Lillian WRENN ROWZEE, and her family. Moultrie F WRENN appears in the 1920 Census for Augusta Co VA (7-32-15-93) with wife Mary W, and sons Moultrie F Jr, Edward W, Philip, and Richard P. In the 1930 Census for Augusta Co (ED 4, Family 318), Mary WALKER WRENN (then Moultrie’s widow) is listed with her children: Moultrie F (Jr), Edward W, Philip, Richard P, Margaret R, and Mary S. Rebecca P WALKER, Mary’s sister, is also living with the WRENNs in 1930. Mary WALKER WRENN is listed in "Page Co VA Marriages, 1831-1939, Collected from the Co Clerk’s Office in Luray" by Judy Campbell. The marriage record lists Phillip & Susan WRENN as Moultrie’s parents. His age was noted as 38 (b.c1874), and his middle name as Frederick. Mary Miller WALKER is listed as 21 (b.c1891) and her parents were A C and E R WALKER of Page Co. Mary is listed as born about 1881 in the 1920 Census. Moultrie’s date place of death are from "Someone You Knew, Shenandoah Co VA, 1869-1989" by Stickley, a collection of obituaries from Shenandoah Valley newspapers. That publication notes that Moultrie is buried in Staunton VA.)
     
  5. ayayagirl

    ayayagirl New Member

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    With that said, then could our community petition to have the stone house registered as a historic site, or has this already been discussed?
     
  6. Ozgood

    Ozgood Not a space alien

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    Does it warrent being designated as a historical site?

    What are the liabilities for such a designation and are there any costs involved (and who will pay for them)

    While this house is old and therefore historic, is it significantly historic enough to warrent being designated as a historical site?

    Just because something is old does not mean it is necessarly significantly historic.

    What would be lost if the house were to be removed but its history recorded?
     
  7. mikebnllnb

    mikebnllnb Member

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    Some info below.








    National Register of Historic Places

    Fundamentals

    Where to Start (How to list a property)

    The National Register nomination process starts with your State Historic Preservation Office* (SHPO). Contact your SHPO or check their web page for National Register information, research materials, and necessary forms to begin the nomination process.
    How are Properties Evaluated?
    To be considered eligible, a property must meet the National Register Criteria for Evaluation. This involves examining the property’s age, integrity, and significance.

    • Age and Integrity. Is the property old enough to be considered historic (generally at least 50 years old) and does it still look much the way it did in the past?
    • Significance. Is the property associated with events, activities, or developments that were important in the past? With the lives of people who were important in the past? With significant architectural history, landscape history, or engineering achievements? Does it have the potential to yield information through archeological investigation about our past?
    National Register Listing Process

    • Nominations can be submitted to your SHPO from property owners, historical societies, preservation organizations, governmental agencies, and other individuals or groups. Official National Register Nomination Forms are downloadable or from your State Historic Preservation Office. National Register Bulletins can also provide guidance on how to document and evaluate certain types of properties. Sample Nominations provide additional useful information.
    • The SHPO notifies affected property owners and local governments and solicits public comment. If the owner (or a majority of owners for a district nomination) objects, the property cannot be listed but may be forwarded to the National Park Service for a Determination of Eligibility (DOE).
    • Proposed nominations are reviewed by your state’s historic preservation office and the state’s National Register Review Board. The length of the state process varies but will take a minimum of 90 days.
    • Complete nominations, with certifying recommendations, are submitted by the state to the National Park Service in Washington, D.C. for final review and listing by the Keeper of the National Register of Historic Places. The National park Service makes a listing decision within 45 days.

      *Note: National Register nominations of Tribal properties start with the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer. National Register nominations of federal properties start with the agency’s Federal Preservation Officer.
    Benefits & Owner Information

    Listing in the National Register of Historic Places provides formal recognition of a property’s historical, architectural, or archeological significance based on national standards used by every state. Benefits include:

    • Becoming part of the National Register Archives, a public, searchable database that provides a wealth of research information.
    • Encouraging preservation of historic resources by documenting a property’s historic significance.
    • Providing opportunities for specific preservation incentives, such as:
      > Federal preservation grants for planning and rehabilitation
      > Federal investment tax credits
      > Preservation easements to nonprofit organizations
      > International Building Code fire and life safety code alternatives
    • Possible State tax benefit and grant opportunities. Check with your State Historic Preservation Office for historic property incentives available within your state.
    • Involvement from the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation when a Federal agency project may affect historic property.
    • Find out information on the care and maintenance of your historic property through various NPS Preservation Briefs and Tech Notes.
    • Network with other historic property owners, tour historic areas, or chat with preservationists through Conferences, Workshops, and Preservation Organizations.
    • Celebrate your listing by ordering a bronze plaque that distinguishes your property as listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
    Your Property Rights


    • National Register listing places no obligations on private property owners. There are no restrictions on the use, treatment, transfer, or disposition of private property.
    • National Register listing does not lead to public acquisition or require public access.
    • A property will not be listed if, for individual properties, the owner objects, or for districts, a majority of property owners object.
    • National Register listing does not automatically invoke local historic district zoning or local landmark designation.
    • Federal Regulation 36 CFR 60 authorizes the National Register of Historic Places.
    • Contact your State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) for any specific state rules or regulations
    Federal Agency Historic Preservation

    In conjunction with the Secretary of the Interior, all Federal agencies establish their own historic preservation programs for the identification, evaluation, and protection of historic properties as mandated in Section 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act. These individual agency programs vary greatly in scope, depending on the degree to which the agency owns, controls, or affects historic properties. The NPS Federal Agency Preservation Assistance Program carries out a number of activities to assist Federal agencies in meeting their historic preservation responsibilities. Check with the Federal Preservation Officer (FPO) within a particular federal agency for additional information.
    Tribal Historic Preservation

    The NPS Tribal Preservation Program assists Indian tribes in preserving their historic properties and cultural traditions. Among the responsibilities assumed by these tribes are conducting historic property surveys, maintaining permanent inventories of historic properties, nominating properties to the National Register of Historic Places, and reviewing Federal agency assisted projects. Contact the specific tribal officer from the following list of Tribal Preservation Officers for additional information.
     
  8. mikebnllnb

    mikebnllnb Member

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    The question comes down to this, do we as a community want to keep the stone house as part of Broadlands. If so to what extent and what kind of expenditure are we willing to make?

    I'm all for keep the house as part of Broadlands aesthetics. I however don't think it should be restored beyond it's current state. We should only spend enough money to keep the house in it's current state. If it is found that we need to spend more than VM has proffered towards the upkeep of the house to keep it standing then it should be torn down.
     
  9. rich351854

    rich351854 New Member

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    I think we should look at this as an assett to our community and expand its relevance and usage. Specifically we should look in to converting this to some sort of facility that has "something of value for all inside". Remember in marketing our homes now and in the future people value things like gyms, nature centers, playgrounds (we could do much better with hillside playground), community centers that have events, etc......

    I wish the Board of Directors would come up with some proposals or committess to explore expansion of community ammenities and we could, in this down economy, leverage less expensive labor and materials and expand upon our foundation.

    My key suggestions are as follows (in priority order):

    1. Expand Hillside Playground (or build another one)
    2. Explore Gym Facilities for Broadlands Residents

    Maybe we could transform the stone house in to the HOA and BOD meeting facility along with a party room, and then transform the nature center in to both a Nature Center and Gym
     
  10. Chsalas

    Chsalas Member

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    it's a dump, get rid of it.
     
  11. boomertsfx

    boomertsfx Booyakasha!

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    ?! no it's not -- I think it's a cool historical building! I'm for keeping in good looking condition, ie shore up any potentially catastrophic issues with the house, patch any bad leaks that would further degrade condition, etc. It's one of the few things that makes Broadlands unique IMHO.
     
  12. lilpea

    lilpea Member

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    I'm surprised the Stone House isn't already on a County, State or Federal historic preservation/site, or protected by Hollow Ground. For years the question of who will ultimately own the property has been a tactic for Van Metre to stall on very expensive improvements and now in a last ditch effort before they turn the HOA over to the residents, they are once again using this house as leverage to pass the hefty buck to the HOA/Community.

    In any case, I agree with others the Stone House does make our community unique and I applaud the HOA with their fiscal restraint as it pertains to this house, but they are in an unenviable position.

    Van Metre has owned this home for YEARS and has done little more than board it up, since they plan to turn it over to the community, I have faith our HOA members will get every STINKING dollar out of Van Metre before they turn the house over.
     
  13. flynnibus

    flynnibus Well-Known Member Forum Staff

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    pea - how much we get from VM is already decided - as stated by Cliff in the earlier post.
     
  14. wahoogeek

    wahoogeek New Member

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    a dump that has value.... put it on ebay! (Not really joking here, better to see it moved to a new home than bulldozed like everything else in Loudoun).
     
  15. Zeratul

    Zeratul Well-Known Member

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    irregardless with what the future decisions will be (longer term) I think we, the community are faced with at least having to get an engineering/structural survey done. If the community takes ownership of the property (which sounds like in the near future) then the urgent questions are about the simple safety of the building.

    And as part of this, we should be able to find out what, if any urgent actions need to be taken to at least ensure the structure remains standing and does not pose an immediate safety hazard. And we could assess what, if any mitigation actions should be done to ensure the health of maintaining the status quo.

    And I think the HOA will have to get organized and explore options to present to the community. Perhaps a committee can be formed to create options/proposals. Perhaps the county can be contacted for "partnership"? Just throwing that out there...
     
  16. Ozgood

    Ozgood Not a space alien

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    Irregardless?

    :nono::censored:

    :happygrin:
     
  17. chattycat

    chattycat Member

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    I think it's time to call Ty Pennington at Extreme Makeover: Home Edition! :)
     
  18. Zeratul

    Zeratul Well-Known Member

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    "We visited the LeFEVRE Family Cemetery near the community swimming pool in Broadlands". I think I have been missing this, where is it exactly? Can we walk around there and look?
     
  19. cmbm

    cmbm New Member

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    The cemetary is behind the Community Center Pool. There is a metal fence around it. You can walk to it from the pool.
     
  20. Tech Head

    Tech Head New Member

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    What about the liability costs involved if God forbid, somebody manages to sneak in and injure themselves? Is the HOA covered?
     

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