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The Vulture Menace

Discussion in 'Broadlands Community Issues' started by hornerjo, Nov 6, 2009.

  1. napper

    napper New Member

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    Wow, so now we're name calling? I think that was uncalled for.
     
  2. vacliff

    vacliff "You shouldn't say that."

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    Sounds like perseverance may be the answer.
     
  3. hornerjo

    hornerjo Senior Member

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    Hope so.

    Just for anyone with ideas, which seems to be a lot, we've been dealing with these pests on our roofs for almost two years now. Not saying to not suggest it, but we've most likely talked about it already. Anything can sound good on paper but you have got to think about every aspect of it. Installing something on the roof isn't as easy as it sounds. Getting on the roof of a townhouse is not easy. None of us have ladders that go that far, the only ones we have you have to use on your deck and go up from there at a very steep angle. Only professional installers should be putting anything up there.

    So how much do the installers charge? How much is the system itself? How do we get approval from the HOA and for how long? How much do we need to cover two or possibly 3 full rows of townhouses? What if just 1 person along a row is against it, will they sue or pressure the HOA to take it down if they get woken up / annoyed / sprayed / pets / kids / car/ scared etc etc etc at 5am in the morning or any other time of the day? If we have it up with HOA approval for only a set period of time, and the vultures are still here nearby and once we take it down and they come right back then what?

    We've talked about passive systems, active system (water / sound) and everything from paintball markers to biodegradable pellet guns. Again, not saying to not suggest it but first think of all the questions above.

    I'll tell you why I think the water sprinkler solution is nuts. Sounds great on paper. Install a motion sensored water sprinkler to scare them away! Ok... the sprinklers I looked at run around $100, and aren't ready (or approved usage) for roof top mounting. I didn't find any that were, but I'll guess $250 minimum. Now you need to run conduit of some sort installed from the hose fixture all the way up 3 stories to the roof and must be secured all the way up. All together, that's got to be about $700 installed with parts (probably more with labor of at least 2 people). Not multiply that times 3, and times 2 again for 2 rows (maybe 3). We're looking at ~$4,200 to cover 2 townhouse sections! And thats if everyone agrees to it. To top it off you have to think about insurance. If something, anything, goes wrong with it and damages your or a neighbors house who pays for it? Sorry but that is an insane solution. Might work for single family houses out in the country, but not here.

    Anyway, ideas are always welcome but something that sounds simple might as well be laser beams shot from orbit. Essay rant over. :)
     
  4. flynnibus

    flynnibus Well-Known Member Forum Staff

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    And you didn't call the guy Idiotic first? Pot meet Kettle...
     
  5. Thunderchild

    Thunderchild New Member

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    Let me understand this, the USDA is telling you to kill a federally protected animal and hang it in the tree as a deterrent? OR is the USDA going to kill one of these birds and hang it in the tree?

    I may have missed this somewhere, but I have not seen any mention of trying to remove the food source, have you contacted the County and asked them to remove the dead deer before the vultures have had a chance for lunch?

    I feel sorry for you and your neighbors, as I wouldn't be pleased having them on my roof, good luck with whatever solution you decide upon and have a Merry Christmas.
     
  6. hornerjo

    hornerjo Senior Member

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    No, not us kill it. We pay them, and they kill and hang one. As mentioned before its really a last ditch solution. The dead deers, as far as I can tell, are almost always gone within a couple days. In 10 years I haven't seen any around our street anyhow and the ones I have seen dead I've never seen a vulture on it (although others have). As for any other food sources, I don't know. Beyond a dead raccoon in my back yard earlier in the year I've never seen anything they would consider a food source here beyond trash left out. Rumor has it someone nearby has been feeding them but who knows.
     
  7. napper

    napper New Member

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    Ummm, NO! What I said was: "This thing you say is idiotic is from the USDA professionals" Hornerjo was saying that the sprinkler system on the roof was a silly idea and let's let the professionals handle it. I replied that the sprinkler system IS an idea from the USDA people! You misread my sentence and, of course, want to pick a fight!

    Just for everyone's information, I was trying to be helpful, to both the homeowners and vultures. Forget the sprinkler thing, I understand why it wouldn't work.

    Now, I'll let you all handle it. Obviously, I'm just a random, paranoid person, who doesn't know anything, right? You'd be surprised!
     
  8. napper

    napper New Member

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    Rumor has it someone has been feeding the vultures? Now, that's just gross! And I certainly hope you aren't pointing fingers in this direction.
     
  9. hornerjo

    hornerjo Senior Member

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    It's just a rumor, not pointing fingers anywhere. If you know or hear of anyone who is doing it please ask them to stop.
     
  10. napper

    napper New Member

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    Wow, I haven't seen or heard anything. Feeding vultures is a little strange. It isn't like they can't find their own food, huh?
     
  11. KTdid

    KTdid Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm, where does one find a carcuss to feed a vulture? Maybe that's why it's a rumor...or maybe someone is feeding them "birdseed":rolleyes3:
     
  12. Thunderchild

    Thunderchild New Member

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  13. webeadams

    webeadams New Member

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    So after all this talk of vultures on the forum... a few of them showed up on my rooftop the other morning for the first time ever! They are so spooky looking. Are you sure that this isn't a sign that the Angel of Death is nearby?????
     
  14. KTdid

    KTdid Well-Known Member

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    I particularly enjoy watching them when they have their wings spread open sunbathing. They stand so still they appear as gargoyles.
     
  15. jaxmanjoe

    jaxmanjoe Blah, Blah, Blah

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    These birds kind of resemble turkeys. I wonder if they would be a good replacement on our Thanksgiving tables next year if they are still around.

    What if we throw out some carcasses loaded with a sedative. When they go to sleep we load them all into a tractor trailer and send the truck off to Alaska. No harm no fowl.
     
  16. hornerjo

    hornerjo Senior Member

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    The Vultures seem to now be moving down to the next townhouse rows over on Harvest Green, driven away from Autumnwood by our efforts. Although they are still nesting in the same area (the banging in that respect has not been that effective in my opinion) we have not seen many on our roofs in the last couple weeks.

    Can't see it in the photo, but the vultures are on all 3 townhouse rows. If you are on Harvest Green I suggest joining on the effort and/or contacting the HOA for direction. While those of us on Autumnwood have been chasing them off in the morning/evenings its not as convenient to go into other townhouse sections to do so as well.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. KTdid

    KTdid Well-Known Member

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    The vultures you pictured hang around there quite frequently to sunbathe and move over to the trees at sundown.
     
  18. Villager

    Villager Ashburn Village Resident

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  19. designerRob

    designerRob New Member

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    I'm on Autumnwood Sq. And they hang out in the woods behind my TH. If they didn't destroy parts of my roof and sh1t on my deck I wouldn't care. The tree banging doesn't work btw. But my dog seems to keep them away from my deck at least. I woke up to 4 of them on my deck one Sat. morning.

    IMO people need to quit leaving garbage outside the night before pickup. I think that would help but in the end the birds will probably have to be relocated. Or they'll need to be irritated enough to leave on their own.

    I was cleaning out my gutters the other day and noticed the vent screen from my dryer was torn off. Who knows if this was done by them and who knows if something else is destroyed. I've got a guy coming out to take a look.

    :angryfire: resident!
     
  20. OSimpson

    OSimpson Certified Master Naturalist

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    ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION

    Vultures serve an important function as nature's garbage collectors, helping to keep the environment clean of waste. Habitats must be preserved and pollutants eliminated so these important predators are not lost.


    Many species of vultures have a great impact on their surroundings. They vary from small birds with slender bills, such as hooded vultures, to large hunters with heavy bills, such as African white-backed vultures. These important adaptations help vultures survive and perform important roles in the environment. Vultures feed on the remains of dead animals, sticking their heads deep into the body cavity to pick bits of food.

    Turkey vultures are so resistant to botulism that, when tested, they showed no ill effects when injected with enough botulinus to kill 300,000 guinea pigs. Vultures are immensely important for removing potentially dangerous, bacteria-ridden carcasses from the environment.

    Vultures have long been misunderstood and persecuted by humans, suffering from loss of habitat, illegal hunting and poisons that can accumulate through time in their prey. New World vultures in America, such as the extremely rare California condor, have also been devastated by hunting and habitat loss. Hopefully, captive breeding and release programs will help these birds. Another rare species is the European black vulture (Aegypius monachus). There may only be 800 European black vultures left worldwide, but fortunately more than 20 chicks have been hatched through captive breeding programs.

    There is always a humane way of dealing with wildlife issues. That's is the least we should expect from our neighbors in Broadlands, Certified Wildlife Habitat Community...
     

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